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Hope for the future: NAHSE Annual Conference Recap

By | December 16 th,  2019 | NAHSE, Diversity and Inclusion | Add A Comment

Over the years, the National Association of Health Service Executives (NAHSE) has continued to grow and evolve in size and impact. Leaving this year’s annual conference, we were energized by the infusion of new faces and talent, as well as by the exceptional speakers and sessions. It is clear that diversity is a top priority, but the lack of understanding that still exists around inclusion is striking.

 

ValerieJarrettNAHSE

 

Many healthcare organizations are struggling to engage and retain diverse talent. The power of truly understanding what it means to create and uphold an inclusive culture is something we must all strive to achieve. It is not up to one person in the organization. It is up to EVERYONE at every level in the organization. This commitment to and accountability for diversity, equity, and inclusion (DE&I) are critical to enacting a shift in organizational culture. 

 

During his session at the NAHSE conference, Jack Lynch, President and CEO of Main Line Health, pointed out that the reason they don’t have a Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) is because he is the CDO. It is his guidance and leadership that will push the organization forward, but, as he so eloquently stated, it cannot be him alone.

 

It was encouraging to hear from Jack and other leaders on how their organizations are moving the needle on DE&I. Additionally, we enjoyed interacting with the next generation of healthcare leaders during our participation as judges for the Everett V. Fox Student Case Analysis and Presentation Competition, which focused on addressing the healthcare needs of those experiencing homelessness.

 

The competition honors one of the founding presidents of NAHSE, and serves as a gateway to leadership opportunities for young, aspiring healthcare executives and policy makers. It was exciting to experience the amazing talent and innovative ideas these young leaders are bringing to the healthcare industry.

 

The conference brought to light the continued challenges we face in healthcare, but also hope for the future. It is clear that there are initiatives in place and motivation to improve. If organizations can commit to measurable, actionable effort we will see significant progress on our journey toward equality in the healthcare industry.  

 

 

                  Deanna Banks                       TMuse


Deanna Banks, Principal                                  Tiara Muse, Director Research

 

 

 

Recap: 2019 Women Leaders in Healthcare Conference & Top 25 Women in Healthcare Gala

By | August 27 th,  2019 | Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity, Top 25 Women in Healthcare, Women Leader in Healthcare Conference, MHWomen | Add A Comment

A recent Forbes article examines the Power of the Pack, highlighting that women who support women are more successful, “A woman alone has power; collectively, we have impact.” This impact was abundantly clear during this year’s Modern Healthcare Women Leaders in Healthcare Conference. To describe the collective of amazing women at this conference as inspirational doesn’t do it justice, so we thought we’d create a recap slideshow including some of our favorite insights and takeaways.


Thank you to all who attended and had the courage to share, speak up and raise their hands! Hopefully, we can all harness the energy and inspiration from this great conference and continue to motivate real change.

 

 



We’re positive we didn’t capture everything. What were your favorite takeaways and insights from the conference?

 

The Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare in 2019

By | February 18 th,  2019 | Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity, Top 25 Women in Healthcare | Add A Comment

 

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Furst Group and NuBrick Partners are proud to sponsor the Top 25 Women in Healthcare, the awards program created by Modern Healthcare. This is our 11th year of sponsoring the program, which culminates in an awards gala on August 1 in Chicago.

 

Top25-Women-Faded 

Please click here to read our interviews with previous honorees from the Top 25 awards programs.

 

2019 Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare 

  • NANCY HOWELL AGEE, President/CEO, Carilion Clinic
  • MADELINE BELL, President/CEO, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
  • MARY BOOSALIS, President/CEO, Premier Health
  • DEBRA CANALES, Executive vice president/chief administrative officer, Providence St. Joseph Health
  • DR. MANDY COHEN, Secretary, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
  • TINA FREESE DECKER, President/CEO, Spectrum Health
  • CYNTHIA HUNDORFEAN, President/CEO, Allegheny Health Network
  • LAURA KAISER, President/CEO, SSM Health
  • DR. ANNE KLIBANSKI, Chief academic officer, Partners HealthCare
  • KATHY LANCASTER, Executive vice president/chief financial officer, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals
  • KAREN LYNCH, Executive vice president, CVS Health
  • PATRICIA MARYLAND, President/CEO, Ascension Healthcare
  • DR. BARBARA MCANENY, President, American Medical Association
  • DR. REDONDA MILLER, President, Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • DR. JANICE NEVIN, President/CEO, Christiana Care Health System
  • AMY PERRY, CEO, hospital division Atlantic Health System
  • CANDICE SAUNDERS, President/CEO, WellStar Health System
  • NINFA SAUNDERS, President/CEO, Navicent Health
  • DR. JOANNE SMITH, President/CEO, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
  • JOHNESE SPISSO, President, UCLA Health
  • PAULA STEINER, President/CEO, Health Care Service Corp.
  • PAMELA SUTTON-WALLACE, CEO, University of Virginia Medical Center
  • SUSAN SWEENEY, President/head, U.S. Commercial Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • SEEMA VERMA, Administrator CMS
  • ANDREA WALSH, President/CEO, HealthPartners

 

LUMINARIES

  • MARNA BORGSTROM, CEO, Yale New Haven Health
  • DR. JOANNE CONROY, President/CEO, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health
  • SUSAN DEVORE, President/CEO, Premier
  • JUDY FAULKNER, President/CEO, Epic Systems Corp.
  • SISTER CAROL KEEHAN, President/CEO, Catholic Health Association 

 

WOMEN TO WATCH

In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Women Leaders to Watch:

  • AMBER CAMBRON, President/CEO, BlueCare Tennessee
  • DR. LAURA FORESE, Executive vice president/chief operating officer, New York-Presbyterian
  • DR. REBEKAH GEE, Secretary, Louisiana Department of Health
  • DR. PATRICE HARRIS, President-elect, American Medical Association
  • SALLY HURT-DEITCH, Chief nursing officer, Tenet Healthcare Corp.
  • LYNN KRUTAK, Chief financial officer, Ballad Health
  • REBECCA MADSEN, Chief consumer officer, UnitedHealthcare
  • DR. RHONDA MEDOWS, Executive vice president of population health, Providence St. Joseph Health
  • MIKELLE MOORE, Senior vice president of community health, Intermountain Healthcare
  • HEATHER WALL, Chief commercial officer, Civica Rx

 

For more information, click here.

Mergers & Acquisitions in Practice: A ground-level view

By | February 14 th,  2019 | leadership traits, Ground-level view, Harnessing your board, clinical training, decision-making | Add A Comment

First-time CEO Ronnie Ursin shares lessons learned through his experience with Tower Health


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The healthcare news cycle fills up fast these days with news of mergers and acquisitions. But what really happens at ground level as organizations are acquired or come together? Ronnie Ursin, chosen as one the 10 Leaders to Watch by Modern Healthcare as part of its Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare program, has gotten a close-up look at one of those situations since being named the CEO at Jennersville Hospital in West Grove, Pennsylvania.

 

Reading Health System purchased five local hospitals from a major healthcare chain. Reading renamed itself Tower Health and hired Ursin, a former Reading executive who was working as a chief nursing officer at a hospital in his home state of Louisiana, to lead the 63-bed Jennersville facility.

 

“Speaking from the standpoint of Tower Health, one of the things we are working on very diligently and carefully is the organizational culture,” Ursin says. “About 95 percent of the staff at Jennersville Hospital worked in the previous culture.”

 

Ursin has held several “town hall” meetings with all Jennersville staff members since taking over.

“We are trying to take their feedback and put it into action,” he says. “We still have some people on the fence, but we are doing our best to communicate that we are going to do our best for our patients and staff, and we are going to do right by our doctors. That’s going to drive our success.”

Cultural implications can sometimes be overlooked in M & A as most of the attention is laser-focused on financials, yet evidence is clear that few things can derail a transaction more quickly. Taking time to work diligently and thoughtfully with all affected team members is essential, for human capital remains a company’s greatest asset.

 

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Actions speak volumes for leaders

 

Jennersville’s previous owner was hampered by large financial losses at its facilities across the country. Ursin and his team have come in and targeted tangible improvements to infrastructure and equipment, demonstrating a willingness to invest in its staff and demonstrating good faith at the same time.

 

“We have a full plan to invest in surgical scopes and other instruments. We’re investing in getting more patient care equipment such as EKG machines, and facility upgrades. And we’re looking at potentially bringing in a Da Vinci robot device to support our service lines,” he says.

 

Tower Health, says Ursin, also is installing the Epic health IT system to achieve the aim of patients having just one chart across the entire health system.

 

Carrying through on promises builds credibility for new leaders, and employee engagement rises. That, in turn, usually translates to increased productivity, something that Ursin and Tower are conscious of.

 

Harnessing your board

 

In building a new culture, Ursin and his leadership team have help. At the board level, Ursin’s directors are carrying the message as well. Since they have been interwoven into the community for some time, their involvement carries no small weight.

 

“Because Tower Health is new to the community, a major part of our board members’ role is to convey the message we have about advancing health and transforming the lives of the people in our community. They are taking our initial quality initiatives and are able to articulate that to members of the community.”

 

Board members have greater responsibility and experience higher stakes in today’s healthcare climate. The best CEOs provide ...

 

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Key Characteristics of Successful Chief Human Resources Officers

By | February 6 th,  2019 | C-suite, Global Leaders, globalization of business, CHRO, HR, IIC Partners | Add A Comment

Image courtesy of IIC PartnersMembers of IIC Partners recently had the opportunity to engage in candid conversations with a variety of global leaders about the Chief Human Resource Officer (CHRO) role and what it takes to be successful. They offered insights into the world of CHROs, how critical the role is in an organization, and how instrumental it is in shaping the current and future growth of leading companies.

 

Below are a few of the key points that are covered in the article:

 

Background and Experience of a Successful CHRO
  • As a fundamental for human resource management, most professionals interviewed indicated that “people skills” were critical to their success.
  • Solid business experience and understanding of your individu­al business model is at least as important as intuitive human interaction skills for success.
  • For some of the CHROs interviewed, success could be attributed to individual challenges.
The Most Pressing Challenges for the Twenty First Century CHRO
  • “The ability to bring the right quality of talent in a highly competitive market,” says Arun Paul. With historically low unemployment rates throughout the world it is hard to find the right kind of talent for roles.
  • Some HR professionals mentioned distinct challenges related to the economic or political environment in which they operated and not just in developing countries.
  • Maintaining employee engagement is a huge challenge. According to Nicola Hale, “finding ways to continuously inspire and motivate others … whilst at the same time keeping this balanced and looking out for people… it’s very easy for leaders to lose a sense of perspective.” 
The Characteristics of the ideal CHRO in Future Business Models
  • When asked what characteristics or traits would be critical for a CHRO to meet an organization’s future needs, responses varied widely, no doubt reflecting the specific needs of the organization in question as well as the background of the individual CHRO.
  • One common theme was that leaders are going to have to really adapt to the changing environments and the HR person needs to be able to help other leaders in that transformation.
  • Most importantly, HR needs to focus on people and not so much on processes and measurement as they were before.

Download the full article here to see more insights on the CHRO role and its crucial impact on an organization.

 

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IIC Partners Global Human Resources Practice Group

The IIC Partners Global Human Resources Practice Group is comprised of a seasoned team of executive search consultants with unparalleled industry knowledge and expertise in identifying the best senior executive Human Resources talent. Human Resources executives must possess the technical qualifications, right leadership style and serve as a trusted advisor to the senior leadership team. The IIC Partners Global Human Resources Practice Group has unrivaled access to passive talent markets in over 34 countries and regularly collaborate to deliver the right candidate to the client.

 

Visit www.IICPartners.com for more information.

Making the Case for Gender Diversity: Women in Healthcare Leadership

By | January 30 th,  2019 | women in leadership, Modern Healthcare, Modern Healthcare Top 25 Women, women leaders, Top 25 Women in Healthcare, leadership traits | 1 Comments
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Real-world advice: ‘As more women join boards and demonstrate the value they add, the system will become self- perpetuating,’ says Helena Morrissey

 

 

The American people have spoken. A majority want more women leaders in business and politics, even though they also believe women typically have to work harder to prove their skills and have more obstacles on their way to the top. In fact, 54 percent say gender discrimination plays a large role in why there aren’t more women in positions of executive leadership.

 

Those are some of the results of a fascinating new study by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center. Their implications are implicit: Pressure is growing for better gender and ethnic diversity in every sphere of public life.

 

As longtime sponsors of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare leadership awards curated by Modern Healthcare, we have seen the momentum and the drumbeat growing for this type of sea change. While challenges certainly remain – the number of women who are employed as CEOs of the companies in the S&P 500 is declining instead of increasing – we remain optimistic that transformation is in the offing.

 

The corporate world can be slow assimilating societal changes, yet society is clamoring for more women in leadership. According to Pew, Americans view women leaders as better than male leaders in:

  • Creating a safe and respectful workplace
  • Valuing people from different backgrounds
  • Considering the societal impacts of major decisions
  • Mentoring young employees
  • Providing fair pay and good benefits

While male leaders get the nod in people’s perceptions that they are better at negotiating profitable deals and taking risks, the value placed on female leaders does not end there. Asked specifically about gender and political leadership, for example, the Pew survey results reveal that women are perceived as stronger in standing up for what they believe in, being honest and ethical, working out compromises, and being compassionate and empathetic. Who wouldn’t want to work for leaders like that?

 

The situation in healthcare

 

Only 8 of the top 100 hospitals in the U.S. have a woman CEO, according to a 2016 survey conducted by Rock Health, a venture fund dedicated to supporting “companies improving the lack of senior female leadership is not unique to healthcare, it is notable that nearly 73 percent of medical and health service managers are women. The largest part of the workforce in hospitals are nurses, who are predominantly women; and women make most healthcare decisions for their families — so why are women not equally represented at the board and C-suite level.

 

Yet, here too, there is hope. A national campaign entitled “20% by 2020” represents another push to get women on boards, with the goal of having women occupy 20 percent of board seats by the year 2020. Fortune 50 companies such as Kohler, Coca Cola, and more are targeting 20 percent women CEOs by 2020. The 30% Club started in 2010 in the UK with a goal of achieving 30 percent women on FTSE-100 boards and is now a global movement based on the recognition that “better gender balance leads to better results.” California also enacted a new law recently mandating publicly traded companies headquartered in the state have at least one female board member by the close of 2019, and more by close of 2021. This is no small task, but healthcare leaders must also be at the front of the line in the pursuit of more diverse and inclusive leaders.

 

Compensations laws are also gaining traction with several states embracing laws aimed at ending wage disparity. A recent Crain’s Business article shows that pay is the number one reason women in Chicago consider switching jobs. As these trends continue, we will also see a rise in additional benefits like flexible schedules, onsite daycare, and family leave policies targeted toward encouraging working mothers and their spouses to find a better work-life balance.

 

Although trends are headed in the right direction, effort and attention are still needed to embrace and embed these policies into common practice. We also need to continue exploring ways to support diverse talent and enhance inclusion at all levels of organizations

 

Why diversity matters: Gender balance in the C-suite

 

Why is it so important for your leadership and board to represent your patients/customers? In simple terms, diversity is a bottom-line issue. Even more specifically: For every 1 percent increase in gender diversity, company revenue increases by 3 percent. More proof: High levels of ethnic diversity increase revenue by a whopping 15 percent. What company can afford to turn away from increased profitability?

 

In my experience in the healthcare industry, I have witnessed that diversity can supply more competitive candidates, as well as more committed and engaged employees. The hiring and recruitment process is a two-way street: potential candidates are not just being evaluated, they are evaluating the company. A significant part of that evaluation includes observing and assessing company culture, diverse leadership and inclusion practices.

 

Job seekers find value in an organization that demonstrably places a high importance on diversity in the workplace. Employees in diverse workplaces also tend to feel a stronger commitment, experience greater collaboration, and, consequently, retention is higher. Statistics on business practice also highlight that improved hiring practices focused on diversity result in increased profitability, better candidate attraction, and more engaged employees.

 

Diversity and talent: 3 things organizations can do

 

Given the evidence of the essential role that diversity and inclusion play in corporate success, the healthcare sector needs to pay particularly close attention to accelerating change in the increasingly competitive talent acquisition environment.

 

Keep in mind that there is no single approach to diversity and inclusion; it must be part of a larger strategic plan that includes alignment of business and talent strategies. Another key element in driving change in diversity and inclusion is recognizing and acknowledging unconscious bias. Everyone has these biases, but companies need diversity and inclusion training and a plan to overcome those biases. To successfully impact these strategies, organizations should:

 

  1. Set goals and develop a plan. Have a mission statement, as well as supporting objectives set around diversity and inclusion.
    • Ensure your company’s diversity and inclusion policy/mission statement is highlighted and easy for all to find.
    • Remember, boards and search committees must represent similar diversity profiles
    • Have measurable goals and timelines for what you want to accomplish.
  2. Implement the plan — launch your diversity and inclusion strategic plan with all-company meetings/town halls. Senior leadership must get behind the plan and “walk the walk.”
    • Project the image reflective of diversity and inclusion that you want to represent in your organization. Use diversity-rich images for your website and other marketing materials.
    • Look at where you recruit. By actively sourcing minority candidates in the right places — for example, participating in professional associations and groups with desired gender or ethnic characteristics — you will have a better chance of attracting and retaining diverse talent.
    • Standardize aspects of the recruitment process to minimize the effect of performance bias on hiring decisions.
      • Review and test job descriptions for gender (and other) bias.
      • Standardize objectives related to hiring (i.e., the competencies and skills needed/desired) in advance of candidate search. Determine what competencies are needed and stick to them. This will allow hiring decisions to be unbiased, because candidates will be judged on their skills, experience and qualifications.
      • Make sure recruiters/search partners standardize all shortlist resumes to remove any possible bias triggers.
      • Hire a Chief Diversity Officer — having a leader at the executive level and participating in strategic discussions signifies a deep commitment to diversity.
  3. Measure results — engage employees to report on activities and periodically measure progress and share results.
    1. Celebrate and highlight your organization’s success — this may include sharing anecdotal stories, awards/incentives or other recognition.
    2. Access benchmark information. The AHA’s Institute for Diversity and Health Equity is paving the way with data, tools and resources (including an ongoing publication of their benchmarking study of U.S. hospitals) that help you learn more about ongoing efforts addressing healthcare disparities and improving diversity management practices.

3 things women should do

 

We’ve talked about corporate best practices. What about individual best practices? To elevate their leadership status, we offer these suggestions to women leaders:

  1. Find a mentor and be a mentor. Having a strong female leader, role model, or mentor is often cited as the primary reason women got into leadership.
  2. Network with women healthcare leaders. Connecting with other industry leaders strengthens connections and an understanding of what it takes to become a leader.
  3. Ask for leadership roles. Potential leaders may be overlooked because the current leaders did not know about the person’s interest. Speak up and voice interest in leadership roles.

Conclusion

 

Have a plan. Set goals. Measure your progress.

 

Ultimately, developing a comprehensive diversity and inclusion program is an ongoing journey, not a destination. Nonetheless, it is time for action in the healthcare industry. If organizations can set clear goals and act on inclusive strategies, then progress can, at last, be made. Rather than revisiting this topic in future publications, we hope to read about the hugely profitable companies that have propelled their organizations into the modern era with resoundingly successful diversity policies and practices that are reflected in the C-suite.

 

With greater focus, we should strive to get to a point where diversity and inclusion are so much a part of an organization’s culture, that you no longer need to have strategic goals on diversity and inclusion. As Helena Morrissey, CEO of Newton Investment Management and 30% Club6 Founder said, “As more women join boards and demonstrate the value they add, the system will become self-perpetuating.” Organizations and leaders must make diversity and inclusion an expectation and an assumption. Only then can they reap the rewards together.

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From scratch: A tale of diversity in action

By | January 25 th,  2019 | Changing Face of Healthcare Leadership, Diversity in action, Young executives, Working Effectively | Add A Comment

Mario Garner drives success through mirroring the community


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What would you do if you had the opportunity to start a hospital from scratch? How would you staff your leadership team? What type of culture would you strive to create?

 

Mario Garner, now the chief operating officer for two Memorial Hermann hospitals in Houston,
MH Southeast, Pearland and a free-standing emergency room, has had the chance to start with a blank 
slate twice, and he’s not even 40 yet.

 

In 2013, he became the CEO of New Orleans East Hospital, which was built after Hurricane Katrina decimated the neighborhood in which it is placed. And in 2015, he moved to Texas to serve as CEO of the new Memorial Hermann Pearland Hospital.

 

“It was a tremendous opportunity to build a team to meet the needs of the respective communities,” Garner says today. “It was a clean slate, so I did not inherit a way of doing things. I was able to spark a level of interest by being creative with the teams I was able to build at these respective campuses.”

 

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Diversity is a must-have ingredient

 

In both cases, Garner made it a point to make sure his leadership teams reflected the communities they served. New Orleans East is an urban hospital in the inner city; Pearland is in a diverse suburban setting in the Houston metro area.

 

Diversity has been shown to be essential for successful organizations. Study after study shows that companies with diverse leadership are more successful financially, are more innovative, function better and make more deliberate decisions than those lacking diversity.

 

“The leadership teams at both of these de novo hospitals were able to bring innovative ideas and best practices from various other locations,” he adds. “At New Orleans East Hospital, we were able to recruit physicians fairly easily. By the time we opened the doors, we had more than 100 credentialed physicians for the campus – which spoke to the physicians’ interest. Some were eager to return to the community, while others wanted to come in and serve in what was in many regards an underserved area. We also didn’t have the challenges of overcoming an aged physical plant, so it was very easy to recruit.”

 

Pearland was a bit different situation, but just as exciting, he says. “Memorial Hermann has a methodology for operating our hospitals, so we were able to take many of those components and lay them as a foundation. Then, we were able to build on that with the unique aspect of opening a new hospital and establishing a positive culture, one that would create employee engagement, as well as engagement with our physicians and patients.”

 

Working effectively with the board

 

The unique governance structures of both hospitals also gave Garner broad experience in very different situations.

 

“At Memorial Hermann, I had the opportunity to work closely with corporate infrastructure,” he says. “I reported to a regional president who was able to provide significant guidance as

to the Memorial Hermann way of hospital operations. She helped me overcome any barriers or roadblocks when it came to acquiring what I needed to execute contracts and other activation components to get the hospital open on time and under budget.”

 

New Orleans East was completely different. The hospital was built with ...

 

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A template for change: Continual transformation is a must for leaders

By | January 8 th,  2019 | change management, Changing Face of Healthcare Leadership, change agents, transformational leadership | Add A Comment

Atrium Health’s Gene Woods provides guidance for enacting a ‘relentless pursuit of excellence’GeneWoods-Headshot

 

At a recent Modern Healthcare gathering on transformation, Atrium Health CEO Gene Woods gave an impassioned presentation on how health systems need to evolve and reinvent themselves. Yet he also says continual transformation is something he and his leadership team must take to heart themselves.

 

“In my 27-year career, the field is changing faster than any of us anticipated,” he says in an interview. “Just look at Medical knowledge and how it is now doubling every several months. This is just one small example of why it’s so important for healthcare leaders to be learning, and that’s what my team and I have been doing. It’s probably been more intentional than anything I’ve ever done.”

 

A quote from leadership expert and former GE chairman Jack Welch is something Woods can quote from memory on this topic: “If the rate of change on the outside exceeds the rate of change on the inside, then irrelevance is near.”

 

Thus, among other actions, Woods and his team have created an ongoing series of what he calls “Home and Aways,” where successful and innovative healthcare organizations visit Atrium to share best practices, and Atrium leaders travel to other healthcare companies to do the same.

 

The exchanges benefit the organizations, but also serve as leadership development exercises for the teams involved. Managing change is high on a CEO’s list these days, and organizational leaders must be painstaking in making sure their teams are aligned. That, in part, has led to a rise in the use of executive team performance training.

 

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How other industries adapt to change

 

But Woods’ interest in transformation doesn’t stop at the boundaries of the healthcare industry. “Sometimes, we can be insular as a field,” he says, “and not recognize what other fields are doing as they’re adapting to change.”

 

So, Woods leans on his board chair, Ed Brown, to help him and his senior leaders learn from other industries as well.  Brown put together the financing for the new stadium that is home to NFL’s Carolina Panthers. Brown currently serves as CEO of Hendrick Motors, the most recognized brand in auto racing, and Woods notes that the entire auto industry is going through transformation as well.

 

“The key thing,” Woods says, “is being more intentional, not just around what’s happening with other health systems throughout the country but looking at what’s happening in other industries and how they have adapted over time.”

 

Forward thinking is part of what has made Woods, the former chair of the American Hospital Association, one of the most influential CEOs in the country. Even when he took the reins of Atrium two years ago (then known as Carolinas HealthCare System), he left no stone unturned in examining and reinventing a historically successful organization.

 

“I think the changes we’re making are about how to continue to position ourselves to be successful for the next decade and beyond,” he says. “Standing still is not an option. Standing still is going backwards. And so, we continue this relentless pursuit of excellence. That requires that we continue to make changes. The resiliency in the face of change is something I’ve really been proud of in our team.”

 

Examining one’s own leadership

 

Woods says he expects just as much openness to change in himself as he does in the Atrium team.

 

“My philosophy is this: No matter how accomplished of a leader you are, no more than 60 percent of your experience will be relevant to your new organization; there’s probably 40 percent that you have to learn and digest. That keeps you a bit humble and keeps you in a listening mode,” he says.

 

A leader who goes into a new position simply planning to share their vaunted experience “may miss some of the cultural cues,” Woods adds.

 

For reasons such as these, an increasing number of ... 

 

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Leadership in action: How one organization is creating a strong development program

By | December 11 th,  2018 | Leadership Development, developing leaders, leadership traits, talent pipeline | Add A Comment

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Deanna Banks, Principal - Furst Group, was recently asked to join the advisory board for MD Anderson’s Leadership Institute. This phenomenal group of professionals and experts from all areas of healthcare and leadership is charged with supporting MD Anderson’s initiative to create a development program for existing and upcoming leaders within their organization.

 

By examining a wide-range of challenges and opportunities leaders will face, including transformation change, multi-generational teams, emotional intelligence, and more, MD Anderson hopes to dig deep into what works and what doesn’t from a curriculum and real-world application standpoint. The advisory board aims to share trends, best practices, theory and other insights that will help guide the organization in their efforts.

 

Banks’ strong background in diversity, governance and talent management allows her to bring a unique, practical application perspective on these topics. Having worked with hundreds of organizations and thousands of leaders in her 20+ years of executive recruitment, Banks brings a core body of knowledge that balances well with the backgrounds and experience of others on the advisory board.

 

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“I look forward to engaging with the board and the amazing team at MD Anderson,” said Banks. “This is an exceptional opportunity to build a program with a strong foundation in academics and theory, as well as real-life application and best practices that most organizations struggle to create, but MD Anderson has tapped some of the best minds in the space to assist in their efforts. The collective intelligence of this team will no doubt result in the development of an outstanding program.”

 

 

Physician leadership profile: Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck brings rare perspective to healthcare’s most vexing issues

By | December 5 th,  2018 | population health, healthcare disparities, healthcare executives, value-based care, physician leadership, leadership traits, mission-based leadership | Add A Comment

Hasbrouck-LamarAt a time when the healthcare industry is putting a premium on physician leadership, while seeking to address the disparities threatening value-based care, few executives are better positioned at the convergence of those streams than LaMar Hasbrouck.

 

Hasbrouck, who holds an MD and an MPH, is Senior Advisor for Strategy and Growth with the American Medical Association. He helps design and build the association’s equity portfolio, as well as cultivate corporate and private foundation relationships. He also guides the association’s chronic disease initiatives and heads efforts to improve internal team cohesion.

 

“I describe my job as a strategy whisperer,” he says. “I’m a fresh set of eyes to look at problems in healthcare and advise the Group VP where we should be putting our resources and what types of talent we should hire.”

 

But don’t be fooled; that fresh set of eyes has experienced a lot. Hasbrouck has worked at the local, state, federal and international level in healthcare. He worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 11 years, first as a senior medical officer and later as the director of its work in Guyana, South America.  He was health commissioner of New York’s Ulster County, leader of the Illinois Department of Public Health and CEO of the National Association of County & City Health Officials.

 

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That’s a rare perspective on some of healthcare’s most vexing issues. As such, he finds that the various entities don’t often work well together. That’s a challenge, because all hands are needed to try to solve the tenacious problems in healthcare.

 

“The local level works best with the state level, and the state works well with the federal, but the local and federal levels don’t work well together,” he says. “Then, at the global level, there tends to be a real disconnect in that the U.S. government tends to be one small layer in a very large pool with a lack of fluidity.”

 

Despite his distinguished track record, Hasbrouck is bold in championing solutions outside traditional thinking and is eager to bring his experience to bear on a wide range of issues. His international experience, from South America to Africa, also has molded his views.

 

“What I have learned in my travels is that innovation is essential for solving problems, yet it’s the simple things that you take for granted,” he says. “For instance, when I was in Uganda, we had problems getting medications into hard-to-reach areas. We considered flying the medicine in, but then we came up with the idea of a motorcycle tag team using dry ice to keep the medicine cool.

 

“We didn’t stop there. We trained some laypeople as health workers to address the most common side effects with the patients.”

 

Hasbrouck grew up in a world where preventive health didn’t exist. His family, led by a single mom, was, for a period, reliant on welfare to survive.

 

“It might be surprising to some people, but it was a very happy time,” he says. “We were materially poor, but spiritually and culturally rich. We were inventive in our play because we didn’t have material things. I didn’t know I was deprived, although there were clearly not a lot of male role models who were white-collar professionals.”

 

Yet it’s precisely that upbringing that gives Hasbrouck his mission in stamping out inequity in care.

 

“I have lived that experience and it gives me credibility,” he says. “I’m very driven by my personal narrative. I have chosen roles carefully by the impact I can have through my skills and competencies.

 

“That’s who I am.”

 

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