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The Top Diversity Leaders Healthcare — 2021

By | September 20 th,  2021 | Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity, Top Diversity Leaders, Top Diversity Leaders in Healthcare | Add A Comment

 

Top-Diversity-Leaders_web

 

Furst Group and NuBrick Partners are proud to sponsor and support the Top Diversity Leaders in Healthcare, the awards program created by Modern Healthcare. This is our 13th year of sponsoring the program, which culminates in an awards gala that will be hosted at the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel in Chicago, IL on December 9, 2021.

 

Please click here to read our recent article, “The spaces in between: Moving DE&I beyond the status quo,” and check out our Diversity Resource Library.

 

2021 Top Diversity Leaders in Healthcare 

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Brenda Battle,

Senior Vice President, Community Health Transformation, Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer, UChicago Medicine

 
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Rosalyn Carpenter,

SVP and Chief Diversity Officer, CommonSpirit Health

 
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Maxine Carrington,

Senior Vice President & Chief Human Resources Officer, Northwell Health

 
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Dr. Bechara Choucair,

Vaccinations Coordiator, Biden administration

 
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Dr. Ronald Copeland, MD,

SVP, Chief Equity, Inclusion & Diversity Officer, Kaiser Permanente

 
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Pete Delgado,

President/Chief Executive Officer, Salinas Valley Memorial Healthcare System

 

 

 
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Dr. Amar Desai,

President and Chief Executive Officer, Optum Pacific West

 
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Delvecchio S. Finley,

President and Chief Executive Officer, Atrium Health Navicent

 
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Eric C. Hunter,

CEO and President, CareOregon

 
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Dr. Edward S. Kim, M.D.,

Physician-in-Chief, City of Hope Orange County, Vice Physician-in-Chief, City of Hope National Medical Center, City of Hope Orange County

 
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Dr. Margaret Larkins-Pettigrew,

Senior Vice President and Chief Clinical Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer, Allegheny Health Network and Highmark Health

 
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Dr. Aletha Maybank, MD, MPH,

Chief Health Equity Officer and Senior Vice President, AMA

 
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Dr. Rhonda Medows, MD, FAAFP,

President of Population Health Management for Providence and CEO of Ayin, Providence / Ayin

 
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Dr. Yavar Moghimi,

Chief Psychiatric Medical Officer, AmeriHealth Caritas District of Columbia, AmeriHealth Caritas

 

 

 
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Dr. Kazuma Nakagawa, MD, FAAN, FAHA,

Medical Director, Neuroscience Institute, The Queen's Health Systems

 
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Dr. Pam Oliver, MD,

Executive Vice President, Novant Health and President, Novant Health Physician Network

 
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Marvin O'Quinn,

President/COO, CommonSpirit Health

 
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Ann-Gel Palermo, DrPH, MPH,

Senior Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Chief of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Education and Research, Mount Sinai Health System
 
| View the Diversity Resource Library  
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Dr. Richard Park,

Founder, CityMD, and Founder and CEO, Rendr Care

 
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Jason Purnell,

Vice President, Community Health Improvement, BJC HealthCare

 
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Dr. Jaewon Ryu,

President and CEO, Geisinger Health

 

 
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Nicholas Tejeda,

Group CEO, The Hospitals of Providence

 

 
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Manika Turnbull, PhD,

Divisional Senior Vice President, Compensation, DEI and Workforce Experience, Health Care Service Corporation

 
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Dr. Melissa Welch,

Chief Medical Officer, InnovAge

 
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Dr. Fran Witt,

President and CEO, Effingham Health System

 
| View the Diversity Resource Library  

 

 

2021 Luminaries 

 

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Greg Adams,

Chair and CEO, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and Hospitals

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Dr. Georges Benjamin,

Executive Director, American Public Health Association

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Dr. Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS,

Chief  Safety and Transformation Officer, Press Ganey Associates

 

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Dr. Bruce Siegel,

President and CEO, America's Essential Hospitals

 

 

2021 Women Leaders to Watch 

In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Women Leaders to Watch:

 

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George Aloth,

President and CEO, CareFirst BCBS Community Health Plan District of Columbia

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Cindy Bo,

Senior Vice President, Delaware Strategy & Business Development, Nemours Children's Health

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Dr. Olaoluwa Fayanju,

Regional Medical Director, Oak Street Health

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Jackie Hunter, DC, MHA,

Senior Director, Diversity, Inclusion and Talent Pipeline, Banner Health

| View the Diversity Resource Library  
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Dr. Olugbenga Ogedegbe,

Director, Institute for Excellence in Health Equity, NYU Langone Health

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Trina Parks, MHA, FACHE,

Executive Vice President, Chief Corporate Diversity and Inclusion Officer, RWJBarnabas Health

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Avonia Richardson-Miller, EdD,

Senior Vice President, Chief Diversity Officer, Hackensack Meridian Health

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Dr. Tracey Veal,

Fellow, Covid19 Collaboration, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

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Dr. Charles Vega,

Associate Dean, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, University of California, Irvine Medical School

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Wylecia Wiggs Harris, PhD, CAE,

CEO, AHIMA

| View the Diversity Resource Library  

 

For more information, click here.

The Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare — 2021

By | February 15 th,  2021 | Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity, Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare | Add A Comment

 

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Furst Group and NuBrick Partners are proud to sponsor the Top 25 Women Leaders, the awards program created by Modern Healthcare. This is our 13th year of sponsoring the program, which culminates in an awards gala that will be hosted virtually on July 23, 2021 in conjunction with the Women Leaders in Healthcare Conference (July 22-23, 2021).

 

Please click here to read our interviews with previous honorees from the Top 25 awards programs.

 

2021 Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare 

Marjorie-Bessel

 

Dr. Marjorie Bessel,

Chief Clinical Officer, Banner Health

Tanya-Blackmon

 

Tanya Blackmon,

Executive Vice President, Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Officer, Novant Health

Odette-Bolano

 

Odette Bolano,

President and CEO, Saint Alphonsus Health System

Mary-Boosalis

 

Mary Boosalis,

President and CEO, Premier Health

Bonnie Castillo

 

Bonnie Castillo,

Executive Director,  National Nurses United

Dr. Priscilla Chan

 

Dr. Priscilla Chan,

Co-founder, Co-CEO, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

| View the Diversity Resource Library  
Marcy Doderer

 

Marcy Doderer,

President and CEO, Arkansas Children’s

Dr. Tamarah Duperval-Brownlee

 

Dr. Tamarah Duperval-Brownlee,

Senior Vice President and Chief Community Impact Officer, Ascension

Dr. Laura Forese

 

Dr. Laura Forese,

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, New York-Presbyterian

 

Tina Freese Decker

 

Tina Freese Decker,

President and CEO, Spectrum Health

 

Angela Hwang

 

Angela Hwang,

Group President, Pfizer Biopharmaceuticals Group

Catherine Jacobson

 

Catherine Jacobson,

President and CEO, Froedtert Health

Laura Kaiser

 

Laura Kaiser,

President and CEO, SSM Health Care

 

Read past profiles:

Laura Kaiser of SSM Health brings courage, conviction to questions around healthcare's future

Karen Lynch

 

Karen Lynch,

President and CEO, CVS Health

 

Read past profiles:

Diversity fuels Karen Lynch’s leadership at Aetna

Anne McCune

 

Anne McMune,

CEO,Carol Emmott Foundation

Dr. Rhonda Medows-1

 

Rhonda Medows,

CEO of Ayin Health Solutions, President of Population Health, Providence

Mikelle Moore

 

Mikelle Moore,

Senior Vice President and Chief Community Health Officer,  Intermountain Healthcare

| View the Diversity Resource Library  
Amy Perry

 

Amy Perry,

CEO, Hospital Division, Atlantic Health System

Mary Pittman

 

Mary Pittman,

President and CEO,Public Health Institute

Dr. Joanne Smith

 

Dr. Joanne Smith,

President and CEO, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

Dr. Susan Turney

 

Dr. Susan Turney,

CEO, Marshfield Clinic Health System

Deborah Visconi

 

Deborah Visconi,

President and CEO, Bergen New Bridge Medical Center

Heather Wall

 

Heather Wall,

Chief Commercial Officer, Civica Rx

 Kate Walsh

 

Kate Walsh,

CEO,Boston Medical Center

Pat Wang

 

Pat Wang,

President and CEO, Healthfirst

 

 

2021 Luminaries 

 

Gail Boudreaux

 

Gail Boudreaux,

President and CEO, Anthem

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Dr. Laurie Glimcher,

President and CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Nancy Howell Agee

 

Nancy Howell Agee,

President and CEO, Carilion Clinic

 

Read past profiles:

Sticking your neck out: Servant leadership in practice

Nancy Howell Agee and her team help rejuvenate a region with Carilion’s success

Beverly Malone 

Beverly Malone,

CEO, National League of Nursing

 

Read past profiles:

Healthcare’s volatility gives way to innovative leadership

Once a reluctant leader, Beverly Malone inspires countless nurses with skills that earned her a seat alongside royalty

 Dr. Penny Wheeler

 

Dr. Penny Wheeler,

CEO, Allina Health

 

Read past profiles:

Even in value-based care, leaders of varying backgrounds can thrive

   

 

 

2021 Women Leaders to Watch 

In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Women Leaders to Watch:

 

Dr. Mary Jo Cagle

 

Dr. Mary Jo Cagle,

Chief Operating Officer, Cone Health

Dr. Amy Compton-Phillips

 

Dr. Amy Compton-Phillips,

Executive Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer, Providence

Kizzmekia Corbett

 

Kizzmekia Corbett,

Research Fellow, National Institutes of Health

Patricia McClimon

 

Patricia McClimon,

Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer, Nationwide Children's Hospital

| View the Diversity Resource Library  
Kristin Myers

 

Kristin Myers,

Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Mount Sinai Health System

Dr. Claire Raab

 

Dr. Claire Rabb,

Senior Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer, Temple University Health System

Dr. Debbie Salas-Lopez

 

Dr. Debbie Salas-Lopez,

Senior Vice President, Community and Population Health, Northwell Health

Roberta Schwartz

 

Roberta Schwartz,

Executive Vice President, Chief Innovation Officer, CEO/Houston Methodist Hospital

Dr. Lacy Smith

 

Dr. Lacy Smith,

Chief Operating Officer and Chief Medical Officer, Cahaba Medical Care

Devon Valencia

 

Devon Valencia,

Chief Information Officer, CareSource

| View the Diversity Resource Library  

 

For more information, click here.

The Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare — 2020

By | February 17 th,  2020 | Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare, Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity | Add A Comment

 

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Furst Group and NuBrick Partners are proud to sponsor the Top 25 Minority Leaders, the awards program created by Modern Healthcare. This is our 12th year of sponsoring the program, which culminates in an awards gala on August 13 in Chicago.

 

Please click here to read our interviews with previous honorees from the Top 25 awards programs.

 

2020 Top 25 Minority Leaders in Healthcare 

Jerome Adams

Dr. Jerome Adams,

U.S. Surgeon General, HHS

Debra Canales

Debra Canales,

Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer, Providence

 

Read past profiles:
Debra Canales strives to put people first in the mission of healthcare

Genevieve Caruncho-Simpson

Genevieve Caruncho-Simpson,

President and Chief Operating Officer, Texas Health Aetna

Augustine Choi

Dr. Augustine Choi,

Dean, Weill Cornell Medicine

Bechara Choucair

Dr. Bechara Choucair,

Senior Vice President and Chief Community Health Officer, Kaiser Permanente

Imelda Dacones

Dr. Imelda Dacones,

President and CEO, Northwest Permanente

Garth Graham

Garth Graham,

President, Aetna Foundation and Vice President, Community Health and Impact, CVS Health

Danielle Gray

Danielle Gray,

Senior Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina

Audrey Gregory

Audrey Gregory,

CEO, Detroit Medical Center

 

Patrice Harris

Dr. Patrice Harris,

President, American Medical Association

 

Sachin Jain

Dr. Sachin Jain,

President and CEO, CareMore Health

 

Read past profiles:

The healthcare system is broken. Sachin Jain and colleagues want to help transform it

Transitioning to CEO? Self-awareness is Vital

Vivian Lee

Dr. Vivian Lee,

President of Health Platforms, Verily Life Sciences

Ana Pujols McKee

Dr. Ana Pujols McKee,

Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Joint Commission

 

Read past profile:
Quality, safety fuel Pujols McKee's drive at The Joint Commission

Rhonda Medows

Dr. Rhonda Medows,

CEO, Ayin Health Solutions and President of Population Health, Providence

Philip Ozuah

Dr. Philip Ozuah,

President and CEO, Montefiore Medicine

Ketul Patel

Ketul Patel,

President, Pacific Northwest Division, CommonSpirit Health and CEO, CHI Franciscan

Dennis Pullin

Dennis Pullin,

President and CEO, Virtua Health

Javier Rodriguez

Javier Rodriguez,

CEO, DaVita

Jaewon Ryu

Dr. Jaewon Ryu,

President and CEO, Geisinger Health

 

Read past profile:

Experiences build a strong leadership foundation for Jaewon Ryu

Ninfa Saunders

Ninfa Saunders,

CEO, Navicent Health

Thomas Sequist

Dr. Thomas Sequist,

Chief Quality and Safety Officer, Partners HealthCare

Rajesh Shrestha

Rajesh Shrestha,

Chief Operating Officer, Community-Based Care, Intermountain Healthcare and CEO, Castell

Nicole Thomas

Nicole Thomas,

Hospital President, Baptist Medical Center South

 Michael Ugwueke

Michael Ugwueke,

President and CEO, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare

 

Read past profile:

Michael Ugwueke helps Methodist South turn around

Kimberlydawn Wisdom

Dr. Kimberlydawn Wisdom,

Senior Vice President of Community Health and Equity, and Chief Wellness and Diversity Officer, Henry Ford Health System

 

 

2020 Luminaries 

 

Lloyd Dean

Lloyd Dean,

CEO, CommonSpirit Health

 

Read past profile:
Dignity Health’s Lloyd Dean leads from experience and welcomes ‘healthcare for all’

Wright Lassiter III

Wright Lassiter III,

President and CEO, Henry Ford Health System

 

Read past profile:

In healthcare's new order, no time to bask in past success

Kevin Lofton

Kevin Lofton,

CEO, CommonSpirit Health

Beverly Malone 

Beverly Malone,

CEO, National League of Nursing

 

Read past profiles:

Healthcare’s volatility gives way to innovative leadership

Once a reluctant leader, Beverly Malone inspires countless nurses with skills that earned her a seat alongside royalty

 Eugene Woods

Eugene Woods,

President and CEO, Atrium Health

 

Read past profiles:

A template for change: Continual transformation is a must for leaders

Gene Woods' influential leadership poised to enhance Carolinas HealthCare System

 

Diverse leadership is key to solving health disparities

 

 

2020 Minority Leaders to Watch 

In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Minority Leaders to Watch:

 

Jandel Allen-Davis

Dr. Jandel Allen-Davis,

President and CEO, Craig Hospital

Miguel Benet

Dr. Miguel Benet,

Division Chief Medical Officer, Medical City Healthcare, North Texas Division of HCA Healthcare

Tamarah Duperval-Brownlee

Dr. Tamarah Duperval-Brownlee,

Senior Vice President and Chief Community Impact Officer, Ascension

Ahmed Haque

Ahmed Haque,

Senior Vice President of Network Performance and Strategy, Aledade

Barbara Johnson

Barbara Johnson,

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Premier Health

Angelleen Peters-Lewis

Angelleen Peters-Lewis,

Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nurse Executive, Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Stella Safo

Dr. Stella Safo,

Chief Clinical Transformation Officer and Vice President of Prospective Research, Premier

Airica Steed

Dr. Airica Steed,

System Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President, Sinai Health System

Cassandra Willis-Abner

Cassandra Willis-Abner,

Senior Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Experience Officer, Trinity Health

Nichole Wilson

Nichole Wilson,

Vice President of Retail Health Services, Community Health Network

 

For more information, click here.

Recap: 2019 Women Leaders in Healthcare Conference & Top 25 Women in Healthcare Gala

By | August 27 th,  2019 | Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity, Top 25 Women in Healthcare, Women Leader in Healthcare Conference, MHWomen | Add A Comment

A recent Forbes article examines the Power of the Pack, highlighting that women who support women are more successful, “A woman alone has power; collectively, we have impact.” This impact was abundantly clear during this year’s Modern Healthcare Women Leaders in Healthcare Conference. To describe the collective of amazing women at this conference as inspirational doesn’t do it justice, so we thought we’d create a recap slideshow including some of our favorite insights and takeaways.


Thank you to all who attended and had the courage to share, speak up and raise their hands! Hopefully, we can all harness the energy and inspiration from this great conference and continue to motivate real change.

 

 



We’re positive we didn’t capture everything. What were your favorite takeaways and insights from the conference?

 

The Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare in 2019

By | February 18 th,  2019 | Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity, Top 25 Women in Healthcare | 2 Comments

 

Top25-women-2019

 

Furst Group and NuBrick Partners are proud to sponsor the Top 25 Women in Healthcare, the awards program created by Modern Healthcare. This is our 11th year of sponsoring the program, which culminates in an awards gala on August 1 in Chicago.

 

Top25-Women-Faded 

Please click here to read our interviews with previous honorees from the Top 25 awards programs.

 

2019 Top 25 Women Leaders in Healthcare 

  • NANCY HOWELL AGEE, President/CEO, Carilion Clinic
  • MADELINE BELL, President/CEO, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
  • MARY BOOSALIS, President/CEO, Premier Health
  • DEBRA CANALES, Executive vice president/chief administrative officer, Providence St. Joseph Health
  • DR. MANDY COHEN, Secretary, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
  • TINA FREESE DECKER, President/CEO, Spectrum Health
  • CYNTHIA HUNDORFEAN, President/CEO, Allegheny Health Network
  • LAURA KAISER, President/CEO, SSM Health
  • DR. ANNE KLIBANSKI, Chief academic officer, Partners HealthCare
  • KATHY LANCASTER, Executive vice president/chief financial officer, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals
  • KAREN LYNCH, Executive vice president, CVS Health
  • PATRICIA MARYLAND, President/CEO, Ascension Healthcare
  • DR. BARBARA MCANENY, President, American Medical Association
  • DR. REDONDA MILLER, President, Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • DR. JANICE NEVIN, President/CEO, Christiana Care Health System
  • AMY PERRY, CEO, hospital division Atlantic Health System
  • CANDICE SAUNDERS, President/CEO, WellStar Health System
  • NINFA SAUNDERS, President/CEO, Navicent Health
  • DR. JOANNE SMITH, President/CEO, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
  • JOHNESE SPISSO, President, UCLA Health
  • PAULA STEINER, President/CEO, Health Care Service Corp.
  • PAMELA SUTTON-WALLACE, CEO, University of Virginia Medical Center
  • SUSAN SWEENEY, President/head, U.S. Commercial Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • SEEMA VERMA, Administrator CMS
  • ANDREA WALSH, President/CEO, HealthPartners

 

LUMINARIES

  • MARNA BORGSTROM, CEO, Yale New Haven Health
  • DR. JOANNE CONROY, President/CEO, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health
  • SUSAN DEVORE, President/CEO, Premier
  • JUDY FAULKNER, President/CEO, Epic Systems Corp.
  • SISTER CAROL KEEHAN, President/CEO, Catholic Health Association 

 

WOMEN TO WATCH

In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Women Leaders to Watch:

  • AMBER CAMBRON, President/CEO, BlueCare Tennessee
  • DR. LAURA FORESE, Executive vice president/chief operating officer, New York-Presbyterian
  • DR. REBEKAH GEE, Secretary, Louisiana Department of Health
  • DR. PATRICE HARRIS, President-elect, American Medical Association
  • SALLY HURT-DEITCH, Chief nursing officer, Tenet Healthcare Corp.
  • LYNN KRUTAK, Chief financial officer, Ballad Health
  • REBECCA MADSEN, Chief consumer officer, UnitedHealthcare
  • DR. RHONDA MEDOWS, Executive vice president of population health, Providence St. Joseph Health
  • MIKELLE MOORE, Senior vice president of community health, Intermountain Healthcare
  • HEATHER WALL, Chief commercial officer, Civica Rx

 

For more information, click here.

Making the Case for Gender Diversity: Women in Healthcare Leadership

By | January 30 th,  2019 | women in leadership, Modern Healthcare, Modern Healthcare Top 25 Women, women leaders, Top 25 Women in Healthcare, leadership traits | 1 Comments
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Real-world advice: ‘As more women join boards and demonstrate the value they add, the system will become self- perpetuating,’ says Helena Morrissey

 

 

The American people have spoken. A majority want more women leaders in business and politics, even though they also believe women typically have to work harder to prove their skills and have more obstacles on their way to the top. In fact, 54 percent say gender discrimination plays a large role in why there aren’t more women in positions of executive leadership.

 

Those are some of the results of a fascinating new study by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center. Their implications are implicit: Pressure is growing for better gender and ethnic diversity in every sphere of public life.

 

As longtime sponsors of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare leadership awards curated by Modern Healthcare, we have seen the momentum and the drumbeat growing for this type of sea change. While challenges certainly remain – the number of women who are employed as CEOs of the companies in the S&P 500 is declining instead of increasing – we remain optimistic that transformation is in the offing.

 

The corporate world can be slow assimilating societal changes, yet society is clamoring for more women in leadership. According to Pew, Americans view women leaders as better than male leaders in:

  • Creating a safe and respectful workplace
  • Valuing people from different backgrounds
  • Considering the societal impacts of major decisions
  • Mentoring young employees
  • Providing fair pay and good benefits

While male leaders get the nod in people’s perceptions that they are better at negotiating profitable deals and taking risks, the value placed on female leaders does not end there. Asked specifically about gender and political leadership, for example, the Pew survey results reveal that women are perceived as stronger in standing up for what they believe in, being honest and ethical, working out compromises, and being compassionate and empathetic. Who wouldn’t want to work for leaders like that?

 

The situation in healthcare

 

Only 8 of the top 100 hospitals in the U.S. have a woman CEO, according to a 2016 survey conducted by Rock Health, a venture fund dedicated to supporting “companies improving the lack of senior female leadership is not unique to healthcare, it is notable that nearly 73 percent of medical and health service managers are women. The largest part of the workforce in hospitals are nurses, who are predominantly women; and women make most healthcare decisions for their families — so why are women not equally represented at the board and C-suite level.

 

Yet, here too, there is hope. A national campaign entitled “20% by 2020” represents another push to get women on boards, with the goal of having women occupy 20 percent of board seats by the year 2020. Fortune 50 companies such as Kohler, Coca Cola, and more are targeting 20 percent women CEOs by 2020. The 30% Club started in 2010 in the UK with a goal of achieving 30 percent women on FTSE-100 boards and is now a global movement based on the recognition that “better gender balance leads to better results.” California also enacted a new law recently mandating publicly traded companies headquartered in the state have at least one female board member by the close of 2019, and more by close of 2021. This is no small task, but healthcare leaders must also be at the front of the line in the pursuit of more diverse and inclusive leaders.

 

Compensations laws are also gaining traction with several states embracing laws aimed at ending wage disparity. A recent Crain’s Business article shows that pay is the number one reason women in Chicago consider switching jobs. As these trends continue, we will also see a rise in additional benefits like flexible schedules, onsite daycare, and family leave policies targeted toward encouraging working mothers and their spouses to find a better work-life balance.

 

Although trends are headed in the right direction, effort and attention are still needed to embrace and embed these policies into common practice. We also need to continue exploring ways to support diverse talent and enhance inclusion at all levels of organizations

 

Why diversity matters: Gender balance in the C-suite

 

Why is it so important for your leadership and board to represent your patients/customers? In simple terms, diversity is a bottom-line issue. Even more specifically: For every 1 percent increase in gender diversity, company revenue increases by 3 percent. More proof: High levels of ethnic diversity increase revenue by a whopping 15 percent. What company can afford to turn away from increased profitability?

 

In my experience in the healthcare industry, I have witnessed that diversity can supply more competitive candidates, as well as more committed and engaged employees. The hiring and recruitment process is a two-way street: potential candidates are not just being evaluated, they are evaluating the company. A significant part of that evaluation includes observing and assessing company culture, diverse leadership and inclusion practices.

 

Job seekers find value in an organization that demonstrably places a high importance on diversity in the workplace. Employees in diverse workplaces also tend to feel a stronger commitment, experience greater collaboration, and, consequently, retention is higher. Statistics on business practice also highlight that improved hiring practices focused on diversity result in increased profitability, better candidate attraction, and more engaged employees.

 

Diversity and talent: 3 things organizations can do

 

Given the evidence of the essential role that diversity and inclusion play in corporate success, the healthcare sector needs to pay particularly close attention to accelerating change in the increasingly competitive talent acquisition environment.

 

Keep in mind that there is no single approach to diversity and inclusion; it must be part of a larger strategic plan that includes alignment of business and talent strategies. Another key element in driving change in diversity and inclusion is recognizing and acknowledging unconscious bias. Everyone has these biases, but companies need diversity and inclusion training and a plan to overcome those biases. To successfully impact these strategies, organizations should:

 

  1. Set goals and develop a plan. Have a mission statement, as well as supporting objectives set around diversity and inclusion.
    • Ensure your company’s diversity and inclusion policy/mission statement is highlighted and easy for all to find.
    • Remember, boards and search committees must represent similar diversity profiles
    • Have measurable goals and timelines for what you want to accomplish.
  2. Implement the plan — launch your diversity and inclusion strategic plan with all-company meetings/town halls. Senior leadership must get behind the plan and “walk the walk.”
    • Project the image reflective of diversity and inclusion that you want to represent in your organization. Use diversity-rich images for your website and other marketing materials.
    • Look at where you recruit. By actively sourcing minority candidates in the right places — for example, participating in professional associations and groups with desired gender or ethnic characteristics — you will have a better chance of attracting and retaining diverse talent.
    • Standardize aspects of the recruitment process to minimize the effect of performance bias on hiring decisions.
      • Review and test job descriptions for gender (and other) bias.
      • Standardize objectives related to hiring (i.e., the competencies and skills needed/desired) in advance of candidate search. Determine what competencies are needed and stick to them. This will allow hiring decisions to be unbiased, because candidates will be judged on their skills, experience and qualifications.
      • Make sure recruiters/search partners standardize all shortlist resumes to remove any possible bias triggers.
      • Hire a Chief Diversity Officer — having a leader at the executive level and participating in strategic discussions signifies a deep commitment to diversity.
  3. Measure results — engage employees to report on activities and periodically measure progress and share results.
    1. Celebrate and highlight your organization’s success — this may include sharing anecdotal stories, awards/incentives or other recognition.
    2. Access benchmark information. The AHA’s Institute for Diversity and Health Equity is paving the way with data, tools and resources (including an ongoing publication of their benchmarking study of U.S. hospitals) that help you learn more about ongoing efforts addressing healthcare disparities and improving diversity management practices.

3 things women should do

 

We’ve talked about corporate best practices. What about individual best practices? To elevate their leadership status, we offer these suggestions to women leaders:

  1. Find a mentor and be a mentor. Having a strong female leader, role model, or mentor is often cited as the primary reason women got into leadership.
  2. Network with women healthcare leaders. Connecting with other industry leaders strengthens connections and an understanding of what it takes to become a leader.
  3. Ask for leadership roles. Potential leaders may be overlooked because the current leaders did not know about the person’s interest. Speak up and voice interest in leadership roles.

Conclusion

 

Have a plan. Set goals. Measure your progress.

 

Ultimately, developing a comprehensive diversity and inclusion program is an ongoing journey, not a destination. Nonetheless, it is time for action in the healthcare industry. If organizations can set clear goals and act on inclusive strategies, then progress can, at last, be made. Rather than revisiting this topic in future publications, we hope to read about the hugely profitable companies that have propelled their organizations into the modern era with resoundingly successful diversity policies and practices that are reflected in the C-suite.

 

With greater focus, we should strive to get to a point where diversity and inclusion are so much a part of an organization’s culture, that you no longer need to have strategic goals on diversity and inclusion. As Helena Morrissey, CEO of Newton Investment Management and 30% Club6 Founder said, “As more women join boards and demonstrate the value they add, the system will become self-perpetuating.” Organizations and leaders must make diversity and inclusion an expectation and an assumption. Only then can they reap the rewards together.

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Diversity matters – Top 25 Women in Healthcare nominations now open

By | October 25 th,  2018 | women in leadership, Modern Healthcare, Top 25 Women in Healthcare, nominations | Add A Comment

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Diversity matters. You matter. And your opinion counts.

 

As you may know, we are longtime sponsors of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare awards for Modern Healthcare. We’re going into our 11th year, actually. The awards celebrate the best leaders in healthcare, and we think they feel especially important and pertinent this year.

 

Nominations are now open for the 2019 Top 25 Women in Healthcare awards, which will be presented at a gala in Chicago next summer in conjunction with the Women Leaders in Healthcare conference, another event we sponsor for Modern Healthcare.

 

We’d encourage you and your team to think about a woman leader who merits consideration for this award. Maybe that’s a supervisor, or a colleague, or a friend. If so, nominate them to be one of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare. Or, maybe that’s you. Consider asking your supervisor to nominate you. The deadline for nominations is Nov. 22. We have no say in choosing the honorees – the editors at Modern Healthcare choose the winners with no input from us.  But we’d like that decision to be a difficult one, and it could be if you’re included.

 

Click here for the link to nominations.

 

The doors are open, and we welcome your participation!

 

Announcing the Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare - 2018

By | February 26 th,  2018 | Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare, Modern Healthcare, Blog, diversity | Add A Comment

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Furst Group and NuBrick Partners are proud to sponsor the Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare, the awards program created by Modern Healthcare. This is our 10th year of sponsoring the program, which culminates in an awards gala on July 18 in Chicago.


Please click here to read our interviews with previous honorees in the two Top 25 awards programs promoting diversity.


2018 Top 25 Minority Executives

 

Click here to see the entire list and find articles and other resources.

 

Healthcare executive Ruth Brinkley: 'I'm not retiring'

By | September 29 th,  2017 | KentuckyOne, Modern Healthcare, Ruth Brinkley, Blog, CEO, Top 25 Women in Healthcare | 1 Comments

Photo of Ruth Brinkley

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare's Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

Respected healthcare executive Ruth Brinkley isn’t sure what’s going to happen next in her career, but she says one thing is certain: “I’m not retiring. This is a very exciting time in healthcare and I want to be a part of it!”

 

Weeks after announcing she was stepping down from her post as CEO of the KentuckyOne Health system, Brinkley said she was looking forward to some R&R before she returned to advise new interim chief executive Chuck Neumann for a couple months.

 

“I’m not even thinking about what I’m going to do next,” she says. “I’m taking some time off for a river cruise in Europe. There’s nothing like water to wash over your soul. It’s the first extended time off I’ve had in a long time.”

 

Brinkley says she will take the last quarter of 2017 to think about what she wants to do next in a lengthy career that has seen her go from a segregated, rural small town in Georgia to multiple honors as one of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare. But with an eye on the future, she doesn’t have regrets about the KentuckyOne experience as three health systems attempted to merge – St. Joseph Health System, Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare, and the University of Louisville Hospital and James Graham Brown Cancer Center. “The governor did not approve the merger,” Brinkley says. “He didn’t want a state entity being managed by a church organization.”

 

The end result was that St. Joseph and Jewish Hospital merged into KentuckyOne, which operated University Hospital until this year, when university administrators said they wanted to reclaim the reins.

 

“Integrating these organizations into a statewide system was a great vision; it was laudable,” says Brinkley, whose veteran experience was sought after by Catholic
Health Initiatives to navigate a complex deal. “At the end of the day, the university wanted to go in a different direction.”

 

While KentuckyOne is in talks to divest Jewish Hospital and other Louisville assets, Brinkley has some advice for her fellow executives as the industry endures a volatile time.

 

“The environment is going to get tougher,” she says. “We know there are going to be significant changes in healthcare, and I believe it’s incumbent on all of us to exercise care and due diligence as we move forward. We are all moving from volume to value, yet, I don’t believe that anyone has quite figured out the full equation to make that work.”

 

And, despite industry initiatives to improve the numbers of diverse executives in the leadership ranks, she believes the climate also is getting tougher on that front.

 

“I am seeing a retrenchment, unfortunately,” she says. “I think women continue to advance in our industry, but I’m not certain about progress for people of color. I believe some of the advancements were made because organizations felt it was
important to promote diverse executives to address disparities and equity of care. I’m concerned that I’m seeing some erosion in that area.”

 

Corporate life was far from Brinkley’s thoughts growing up in a small Georgia town. A physician would provide yearly immunizations for children, but Brinkley never had a physical until she went off to college. She was raised by her grandmother, a teacher, who decided that Brinkley should become a nurse.

 

“I didn’t know what I wanted to be when I went to college, but I didn’t want to be what anyone told me I had to be,” says Brinkley with a laugh. “So, I rebelled against being a nurse.”

 

In time, she came around. She earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing at DePaul University and ascended through the ranks. Health systems are increasingly looking to clinicians to lead organizations as well as medical groups, and Brinkley says her background has been a profound asset for her.

 

“I firmly believe that I am a better leader because of my clinical background and experience,” she says. “I believe that the movement from clinical provider to organizational/enterprise leader is best done progressively, adding additional education and experiences along the way.”

 

But the transition isn’t always as easy as some clinicians think it will be, she warns.

 

“For those who truly desire to lead, it can be a challenge to learn the business and operations language and processes. In order to be successful, it is vital that
leaders keep the core business in mind. It is difficult to separate the enterprise from clinical processes and outcomes.”

 

In the same way, she says, it can sometimes be difficult to separate the politics of the day from the healthcare needs of patients.

 

“But I believe in the American spirit. We will figure it out.”

 

 

SIDEBAR: A grandmother's influence looms large

 

Ruth Brinkley’s first and most powerful role model was her grandmother, who raised her from an infant.

 

“She was 4-foot-11 and not even 100 pounds soaking wet. I was 5-foot-6 by the time I was in sixth grade, but I thought she was a giant,” Brinkley says. “I had great respect for her.”

 

In a time when segregation still plagued the South, and when women were sometimes treated with less than respect, Brinkley’s grandmother taught her many leadership lessons, foremost of which was courage.

 

Although she was a teacher, her husband was a farmer. When Brinkley’s grandfather died, her grandmother could have lost the farm – the crop had been planted but the seed and supplies usually weren’t paid back to the store until the harvest came in.

 

“She didn’t know anything about the business side of the farm,” Brinkley remembers. “She had to quickly learn the business and make sure that people didn’t try to take advantage of her because she was a woman. She would say all the time, ‘I may be little, but I’m not dumb.’ ”

 

Other key lessons, Brinkley says, were these:

 

  • Collaboration. “You can’t really accomplish a lot on your own; you have to build teams. She took in a number of other people’s children, but we were all a part of her family.”
  • Use what you have. “Nobody has all the gifts and all the talents, but you learn to use whatever you have and leverage that.”

 

Brinkley took much of the wisdom she learned from her grandmother and turned it into a children’s book called Grandma Said.

 

“She taught me my worth as a woman and as a woman leader,” Brinkley says. “I’m sure there were times when she must have been afraid and alone, but I never saw her flinch.”

 

 

Personal experiences drive Susan DeVore's efforts to transform healthcare from the inside out

By | September 20 th,  2017 | Modern Healthcare, Susan DeVore, transformation, Blog, CEO, Premier Inc., Top 25 Women in Healthcare | Add A Comment

Photo of Susan DeVore

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare's Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

Healthcare is personal.

 

Even though Premier Inc. is one the largest and most successful companies in healthcare, focusing on performance improvement, its CEO, Susan DeVore, has personal as well as professional reasons for seeking to transform the healthcare industry.

 

Her mother died of hospital-acquired sepsis, and her grandson had a major health scare in dealing with a severe hip infection that appeared during a hospitalization. She says her family is far from unique in that regard.

 

“Anybody who’s interacted with our healthcare system has experienced the fragmentation, the lack of coordination and the misaligned incentives,” DeVore says. “It makes it very hard to navigate. And when you have people who are vulnerable or fragile and put them in that system, there are opportunities for things to slip through the cracks that can have significant implications. There are things in your life that happen to you that you’ll never forget.”

 

The experiences have left her determined to make a difference in the quality and safety at America’s health institutions, although she maintains that we nonetheless have “tremendous healthcare” in this country.

 

“It does drive me,” she says. “It does keep me focused on the importance of this work. We want to solve problems before they become unsolvable. Premier is doing important work, and to be able to do it in scalable ways across the country for current Americans and future generations are what get me up every day. This is the best possible place that I could be to try to help drive that transformation.”

 

While there is much uncertainty and confusion over the future of healthcare, DeVore says she doesn’t think government is well-suited to steer the changes that are needed; they have to come from within the system.

 

“I don’t think government can solve the challenges. I don’t think insurance companies by themselves can solve the challenges,” she says. “I actually think healthcare has to be reformed and transformed from the inside.”

 

And Premier, which works with more than 3,700 hospitals across the country, handling everything from data analytics to national collaboratives to group purchasing, hopes to accelerate the pace of change in the industry.

 

“We have a big footprint,” admits DeVore. “About 85 percent of our healthcare systems would say we’re a strategic partner or an extension of themselves, as opposed to a vendor of services or technology. And, because we sit inside the healthcare systems, and because we have a tremendous amount of data and insight, we can collaborate and innovate with them, and have them be our test bed for ideas.”

 

That footprint is growing. Premier recently purchased Lincare’s specialty pharma business and also bought two continuum-of-care companies. It has expanded its collaboration with pharmaceutical giant Merck on chronic care and also has launched a partnership with the American Society of Anesthesiologists to test methods to tackle the opioid epidemic. They’ll work to address post-operative pain management in a number of Premier-affiliated hospitals.

 

“We can help advance policy changes and we can help advance how hospitals improve,” DeVore says. “When I came to Premier 13 years ago, I saw this incredible relationship with healthcare systems, with lots of data, and the ability to have an impact that is continuous as opposed to episodic. It’s a model that doesn’t exist in a lot of other places.”

 

The awards that Premier has garnered don’t exist in a lot of other places either. It’s a past winner of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and, for the past 10 years running, has been named one of the world’s Most Ethical Companies by the Ethisphere Institute.

 

While Premier has flourished under DeVore’s leadership, she’s nonchalant about her own achievements. During talks with college students (and with her Premier staff as well), she is known to ask them what their superpower is, with the notion that passion unlocks stellar work – and superpowers working together in a team lead to great innovation. But ask her about her own superpower, and there’s nothing flashy about her answer.

 

“I think my superpower is the ability to assimilate and solve puzzles, and navigate around, under and over problems to get to the end goal,” she says. “I’d describe it as a navigation skill. I’m trying to see things that aren’t easy to see and to put the puzzle pieces together in a different way to solve problems or capture opportunities.”

 

With healthcare’s convoluted issues looking like a damaged Rubik’s cube, Premier’s healthcare members are probably glad she’s on the case.

 

 

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