C-Suite Conversations

What healthcare leaders need to know now

Servant Leadership: Valuing Relationships over Process

By | May 21 st,  2020 | Leadership Development, executive leadership, authentic leadership, Servant Leadership, Healthcare Leaders | Add A Comment

As we find ourselves working and leading our teams through the COVID-19 crisis, a meaningful quote by leadership expert John Maxwell resonates with us:

 

“They don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”

 

To us, this quote speaks about “servant leadership.” Servant leadership is the belief that the most effective leaders strive to serve others, including colleagues, direct reports, and employees, rather than accrue power, knowledge, money, or control. Servant leadership disregards title, authority, and hierarchy and, instead, embraces that which serves others so they may become their most effective, valued, and engaged.

 

The increased stress that everyone experiences in varying degrees stirs up natural and powerful self-protective instincts. In a way, the toilet paper panic buying frenzy of a few weeks ago is a remnant of that primal urge. It makes sense.

 

But while it is natural to be self-protective, it is just as evident that we are all sharing the experience of this global pandemic. Especially now, servant leaders must set aside their self-serving efforts and serve others.

 

Knowing the importance of servant leadership and adopting a leadership approach that seeks to help others over ourselves is vital for this time. Allow us to offer three ways that you can demonstrate this style of leadership to engage and serve others.

  • Awareness: Now is an opportune time to be aware of what others are experiencing both professionally and personally. Respect the situations, feelings, strengths, and challenges of those around you. At the same time you must also be aware of the same things about yourself in order to sustain and remain an effective leader.
  • Listening: We all are struggling and need to be heard and understood. Servant leaders listen to understand by allowing more space in the conversation for others, which turns into a wonderful gift. Not only must you hear what is being said, you must notice what’s not being said, including non-verbal cues that play a role in how someone’s message is being conveyed.
  • Empathy: It is important now more than ever to be patient and empathetic toward colleagues who may be experiencing their own considerable stress and fear in their own unique way. Empathy means making room for your colleagues to be themselves. Demonstrating a level of patience for stretched, distracted, and irritated colleagues is vital. Empathize more, judge less.

Take a look around and you’ll recognize how everyone, independent of status or title, is stepping in to serve others, humbly checking that they are all right emotionally and psychologically to engage in the work at hand. Knowing that we are all in this together, imagine what might happen in our personal and professional relationships if we paid less regard to status for a short time and become a servant leader.

 

We will defeat this virus together. Remember, “They don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”

 

9-Steps for Improving Executive Team Performance

By | March 6 th,  2020 | Leadership Development, Executive Team Performance, Executive Leadership Team | Add A Comment

Behind every great CEO is an effective executive team. Investing in your leadership team is crucial to the success of an organization, especially in an industry as multifarious and network-reliant as healthcare.

 

As CEO, your executive leadership team (ELT) acts as the nucleus of a complex and integrated system, through which you can govern and guide accordingly. Each member of the team is your liaison for driving results throughout every department. When melded properly, an empowered and synergetic leadership team is the key to running a successful operation.

 

Mobilizing your team is the start to a strong and prosperous system. Most CEOs inherit their ELT -- and often it is brimming with sharp, experienced professionals. But the best teams are greater than the sum of their parts. Executive harmony is the new competitive edge.

 

Building an all-star leadership team is a learning process. Real results aren’t measured in a day. Substantial growth happens with transparency and time.

 

Here is what that process looks like:

 

Step 1: Listen and Observe

 

Take time to listen, observe and understand. Talk to stakeholders of all levels -- even those outside of the organization. Pay attention to common narratives that define present climate and culture. What are the current expectations, challenges, and opportunities?

 

Step 2: Invest in exploratory discussions

 

To find common ground, promote discourse both one-on-one and in groups. Teams that can connect to a unified identity, security, and purpose more easily meet goals and exceed expectations than those that lack consensus.

 

Step 3: Set goals

 

Introduce personal assessments to gauge motivators, inhibitors, and other indicators of job performance. Make sure your team understands that these are not for evaluation, but to empower strengths and align goals.

 

Step 4: Get to know your team

 

Identify personality types, leadership styles, and communication techniques. Distinguishing these characteristics and organizing them promotes comfort through transparency and will help you build the foundation for a successful leadership team.

 

Step 5: Build trust

 

Encourage vulnerability and honesty to promote trust and strengthen relationships across your team. Instill confidence and passion by drawing clear connections between your strategy, the organization’s mission, and the team’s unified sense of identity. Your team needs to believe in themselves, as well as in your vision, as much as you do. In any effective organization, thoughtful strategy is dependent on passionate execution.

 

Step 6: Clarify your goals

 

Use the knowledge gained from your assessments to clarify goals, configure (or reconfigure) roles, and set reasonable, measurable expectations. Pivot individual skills as needed to enhance group performance.

 

Step 7: Embolden your leaders

 

Encourage your team to work outside of their silos. Cross-communication and collaboration are powerful assets within your leadership toolbox. Energize your team to engage above, below, and across the organization to achieve the best possible outcomes in every situation.

 

Step 8: Think to the future

 

Discuss what your team could look like a year from now. Address uncertainty, ask questions, engage in dialogue, and push boundaries. Visualizing the best-case-scenario early on will keep you and your team goal-oriented and respect the big picture when dealing with day-to-day decision-making.

 

Step 9: Build your plan

 

Use the information gathered through the previous steps to start building your game plan. Consider the core purpose, rules of engagement, and benchmarks for measurement. The executive leadership team is your touchpoint to the entire organization. Acknowledge and harness individual strengths, calibrate effective leadership strategies, and cultivate a sense of identity, purpose, and connection to the team and the organization as a whole.

 

This process and the path you set out on looks different to every organization, every team, and every member. A truly impactful ELT believes in a unified vision that elevates each leader to harness and integrate individual strengths to the betterment of the group’s mutual success. With collective synergy, a solid foundation, and dynamic guidance, your executive leadership team will grow together and maintain a sharp edge over the competition.

 

For a more in-depth look at this process -- including a three-phase expansive journey on assessing, building, and fine-tuning your executive leadership team -- read the CEO Primer: Accelerating Executive Team Performance.

 

Leadership in action: How one organization is creating a strong development program

By | December 11 th,  2018 | Leadership Development, developing leaders, leadership traits, talent pipeline | Add A Comment

PaperAirplanes

Deanna Banks, Principal - Furst Group, was recently asked to join the advisory board for MD Anderson’s Leadership Institute. This phenomenal group of professionals and experts from all areas of healthcare and leadership is charged with supporting MD Anderson’s initiative to create a development program for existing and upcoming leaders within their organization.

 

By examining a wide-range of challenges and opportunities leaders will face, including transformation change, multi-generational teams, emotional intelligence, and more, MD Anderson hopes to dig deep into what works and what doesn’t from a curriculum and real-world application standpoint. The advisory board aims to share trends, best practices, theory and other insights that will help guide the organization in their efforts.

 

Banks’ strong background in diversity, governance and talent management allows her to bring a unique, practical application perspective on these topics. Having worked with hundreds of organizations and thousands of leaders in her 20+ years of executive recruitment, Banks brings a core body of knowledge that balances well with the backgrounds and experience of others on the advisory board.

 

MDAndersonLeadershipInstitute

 

“I look forward to engaging with the board and the amazing team at MD Anderson,” said Banks. “This is an exceptional opportunity to build a program with a strong foundation in academics and theory, as well as real-life application and best practices that most organizations struggle to create, but MD Anderson has tapped some of the best minds in the space to assist in their efforts. The collective intelligence of this team will no doubt result in the development of an outstanding program.”

 

 

Experiences build a strong leadership foundation for Jaewon Ryu

By | August 27 th,  2018 | Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare, Leadership Development, physician leadership, Geisinger, Jaewon Ryu | Add A Comment

 

ryu-blog

Jaewon Ryu, the executive vice president and chief medical officer for Geisinger Health System, trained as both a physician and a lawyer, but says his greatest leadership development came through experiences like the White House Fellows (WHF) Program, a yearlong, non-partisan education program that places early/mid-career people in high-level cabinet offices and trains them for leadership and public service.

 

“Whether training or working as an attorney or a physician, nowhere in that process do you really learn leadership,” says Ryu, a native of suburban Chicago. “You pick up some skills along the way through your training and work, but the WHF Program was a wonderful way to immerse in leadership development – seeing how decisions are made within complex organizations, being able to hear from great leaders, and taking on projects to apply these learnings.”

 

Ryu’s description is apt. Many healthcare executives, including clinical leaders, might believe that taking a seminar or getting a few sessions of executive coaching fortifies them for the work of leadership. But trained, focused work in leadership development is best accomplished with trained facilitators and convened as part of a thoughtful program within a team, allowing a leadership group to find alignment and cohesion. ...

 

Click the button below to read the full article.

 

Read Full Article

 

Executive succession as a talent strategy

By | November 20 th,  2017 | Talent Acquisition, NuBrick Partners, succession planning, Blog, Leadership Development, Executive Succession, Talent Retention | Add A Comment

It’s daunting to think about your executive leaders parting from the organization, but spending time planning for this inevitability can actually reduce surprises and even help retain your top talent. Research has shown that teams feel more engaged when they can see the path forward and have better awareness of development and growth opportunities.


Thinking about succession planning can be overwhelming, but when you utilize a system that walks you through every step it can alleviate organizational anxieties, and help to solidify your plans for future bottom-line growth.


In a recent article in Wharton Healthcare Quarterly, Bob Clarke and Joe Mazzenga of Furst Group and NuBrick Partners found that more than 50 percent of organization had no formalized succession plan for their executive leadership team. So, if you don’t have something in place, you’re not alone.


Succession Planning Graphic

Many HR teams lack the abundance of resources to effectively manage even the immediate needs of an organization, so asking them to look into the future three, five, or even 10 years continues to lose in the battle for time and resources on the priority list. But if it’s reframed properly as a retention strategy, it tends to get the top-line billing that it needs to truly deliver a competitive advantage in talent acquisition and retention, as well as a growth perspective.


Being able to create a data-driven development plan that allows your executive leadership team to thrive comes from knowing where you want to take the organization in the short and long term. It can be difficult to plan effectively if you are unsure of your team’s intentions when it comes to retirement, desire for growth and so on.


Also, when you consider the deep impact an unexpected change in your executive leadership will have both culturally and operationally on your organization, succession planning must be considered an immediate, high-level need.


Learn more about Executive Succession from NuBrick Partners by reading their latest article A Benchmark for Success: Executive Succession and Leadership Development

Wharton Healthcare Quarterly features article on developing physician leaders by Clarke, Mazzenga

By | May 5 th,  2017 | Furst Group, Bob Clarke, NuBrick Partners, organizational leaders, value-based, Blog, Joe Mazzenga, Leadership Development, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton Healthcare Management, physician leadership, Wharton Healthcare Quarterly | Add A Comment

 

The latest issue of the Wharton Healthcare Quarterly is out, and it features a pertinent article from Furst Group's Bob Clarke and Joe Mazzenga on the challenge and reward of developing physician leaders to lead the entire enterprise, not just a clinical department.

 

Published by the Wharton Healthcare Management Alumni Association at the University of Pennsylvania, the latest issue of the Quarterly also features articles on the transition to value-based payment, the coming challenges posed by post-acute care, and creating a culture of value.

 

Clarke is the chief executive officer of Furst Group and NuBrick Partners. Mazzenga is managing partner of NuBrick Partners, our leadership consulting firm, and a Furst Group vice president.

 

The authors acknowledge that both administrators and physicians have work to do to achieve success in this endeavor and that, ultimately, "True leadership is about building teams who create an empathetic and collaborative culture."

 

To read the complete article, click here.

 

 

Page 1/1