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Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare–Debra Canales: The best leaders put people first in the mission of healthcare

By | December 27th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Debra Canales: “Leadership is not just from the neck up.”

 

Classic content: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

 

Shortly before making the move into faith-based healthcare, Debra Canales remembers giving her former boss the business book “Jesus, CEO” by Laurie Beth Jones. He was grateful for the gift – but hid it in a brown paper bag.

 

“He didn’t feel safe,” Canales remembers now. “It was a pretty revealing moment.”

 

Years later, Canales is earning bouquets of accolades for her bold, holistic leadership at Providence Health & Services in Seattle, where the spiritual aspect of healthcare and work is welcomed as a natural byproduct of being human.

 

“What continues to draw me to healthcare is being able to bring my whole self to work as I center myself and think about a bigger purpose,” she says. “Leadership is not just from the neck up.”

 

Canales’ heartfelt worldview is expressed in very tangible ways at Providence, where in just two years as executive vice president and chief people and experience officer she helped achieve a 50 percent increase in women in senior leadership roles. She also led efforts to provide monetary assistance for employees coping with the high cost of healthcare premiums.

 

“I came to Providence because, when I talked with Rod Hochman (Providence’s CEO), he put people as the number one pillar of his strategic plan,” she says. “That was significant. It was a deeply rooted commitment, and part of that was shaping our talent strategy to be reflective of our communities.”

 

The medical assistance program offers free or reduced premiums tied to household income and the federal poverty level. Caregivers (which is what Providence calls all of its employees) who are at less than 250 percent of the federal poverty level pay no premiums or deductibles and are given seed money to cover out-of-pocket costs. Employees at 250 to 400 percent of the federal level get a 50 percent break on coverage.

 

“When we think about extending and revealing God’s love to the poor and the vulnerable, we need to take care of our own and extend that compassionate service to them as well. There has been an outpouring of gratitude and support, especially from a lot of single mothers and fathers,” Canales says. Read more…

 

 

2016 Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare–Tauana McDonald: Leaders remove roadblocks so their people can succeed

By | December 8th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Tauana McDonald: “I believe that having a diverse workforce as well as a diverse leadership team helps us serve our patients better.”

 

Classic content: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

 

She paved the way for the ICD-10 project at Trinity Health in Michigan. She led the move to electronic health records. She mastered meaningful use. Now, she’s wrapping up bundled payments.

 

If you need a major project orchestrated correctly at Trinity Health, you inevitably turn to Tauana McDonald, senior vice president of clinical business operations for the Catholic health system.

 

“I know that I am not a clinician,” she says. “I identify the strategy needs and develop the plans. I lead the work from the corporate office so our clinicians don’t have to focus on operational issues and they can do the work they do best, which is taking care of patients.”

 

From the standpoint of organizational mission and personal satisfaction, it’s a role that McDonald says is a good fit for her.

 

“I think some of the projects I lead are making very positive change,” she adds. “That’s how I get to impact both the patients and the caregivers.”

 

McDonald came close to becoming a physician herself. Both of her mother’s sisters were nurses – one in the operating room and one in pediatrics. She remembers them both as being very nurturing people.

 

“People in the community looked to them during their most vulnerable times and there was something about that quality that really appealed to me,” she says.

 

Read more…

 

 

Debra Canales strives to put people first in the mission of healthcare

By | August 17th, 2016 | Blog | 1 Comment

 

Debra Canales: “Leadership is not just from the neck up.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

 

Shortly before making the move into faith-based healthcare, Debra Canales remembers giving her former boss the business book “Jesus, CEO” by Laurie Beth Jones. He was grateful for the gift – but hid it in a brown paper bag.

 

“He didn’t feel safe,” Canales remembers now. “It was a pretty revealing moment.”

 

Years later, Canales is earning bouquets of accolades for her bold, holistic leadership at Providence Health & Services in Seattle, where the spiritual aspect of healthcare and work is welcomed as a natural byproduct of being human.

 

“What continues to draw me to healthcare is being able to bring my whole self to work as I center myself and think about a bigger purpose,” she says. “Leadership is not just from the neck up.”

 

Canales’ heartfelt worldview is expressed in very tangible ways at Providence, where in just two years as executive vice president and chief people and experience officer she helped achieve a 50 percent increase in women in senior leadership roles. She also led efforts to provide monetary assistance for employees coping with the high cost of healthcare premiums.

 

“I came to Providence because, when I talked with Rod Hochman (Providence’s CEO), he put people as the number one pillar of his strategic plan,” she says. “That was significant. It was a deeply rooted commitment, and part of that was shaping our talent strategy to be reflective of our communities.”

 

The medical assistance program offers free or reduced premiums tied to household income and the federal poverty level. Caregivers (which is what Providence calls all of its employees) who are at less than 250 percent of the federal poverty level pay no premiums or deductibles and are given seed money to cover out-of-pocket costs. Employees at 250 to 400 percent of the federal level get a 50 percent break on coverage.

 

“When we think about extending and revealing God’s love to the poor and the vulnerable, we need to take care of our own and extend that compassionate service to them as well. There has been an outpouring of gratitude and support, especially from a lot of single mothers and fathers,” Canales says. Read more…

 

 

Strategic excellence is Tauana McDonald’s calling card at Trinity Health

By | July 1st, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Tauana McDonald: “I believe that having a diverse workforce as well as a diverse leadership team helps us serve our patients better.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

 

She paved the way for the ICD-10 project at Trinity Health in Michigan. She led the move to electronic health records. She mastered meaningful use. Now, she’s wrapping up bundled payments.

 

If you need a major project orchestrated correctly at Trinity Health, you inevitably turn to Tauana McDonald, senior vice president of clinical business operations for the Catholic health system.

 

“I know that I am not a clinician,” she says. “I identify the strategy needs and develop the plans. I lead the work from the corporate office so our clinicians don’t have to focus on operational issues and they can do the work they do best, which is taking care of patients.”

 

From the standpoint of organizational mission and personal satisfaction, it’s a role that McDonald says is a good fit for her.

 

“I think some of the projects I lead are making very positive change,” she adds. “That’s how I get to impact both the patients and the caregivers.”

 

McDonald came close to becoming a physician herself. Both of her mother’s sisters were nurses – one in the operating room and one in pediatrics. She remembers them both as being very nurturing people.

 

“People in the community looked to them during their most vulnerable times and there was something about that quality that really appealed to me,” she says.

 

Read more…

 

 

Healthcare merger and acquisition is booming. A new article in AHA’s Trustee magazine helps corporate culture survive and thrive once the dust has settled.

By | June 19th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Creating a better culture in the midst of mergers and acquisitions is the subject of a timely new article in Trustee magazine.

 

As this is written, the country’s largest health insurers are sizing each other up for merger and acquisition. The consolidation that has become commonplace among healthcare providers has come to payers as well, and the next several months should begin to determine what the terrain will look like once the dust has settled.

 

The financials are, of course, the driving force in any transaction like this. But the human factor should not be overlooked. Thus, we’re proud to be part of a timely new article in Trustee magazine, published by the American Hospital Association, that talks to healthcare executives who have emerged from the experience with some advice and caution on tackling the thorny job of creating a new corporate culture out of two entities that may have done business very differently in the past.

 

Executives from organizations like HonorHealth, IU Health, SSM Health and Trinity Health share their stories with Trustee. Furst Group’s Bob Clarke and Joe Mazzenga offer insights as well from their decades of experience.

 

Click here to read the article.