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What healthcare leaders need to know now

Physician leadership profile: Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck brings rare perspective to healthcare’s most vexing issues

By | December 5 th,  2018 | physician leadership, healthcare executives, population health, value-based care, leadership traits, healthcare disparities, mission-based leadership | Add A Comment

Hasbrouck-LamarAt a time when the healthcare industry is putting a premium on physician leadership, while seeking to address the disparities threatening value-based care, few executives are better positioned at the convergence of those streams than LaMar Hasbrouck.

 

Hasbrouck, who holds an MD and an MPH, is Senior Advisor for Strategy and Growth with the American Medical Association. He helps design and build the association’s equity portfolio, as well as cultivate corporate and private foundation relationships. He also guides the association’s chronic disease initiatives and heads efforts to improve internal team cohesion.

 

“I describe my job as a strategy whisperer,” he says. “I’m a fresh set of eyes to look at problems in healthcare and advise the Group VP where we should be putting our resources and what types of talent we should hire.”

 

But don’t be fooled; that fresh set of eyes has experienced a lot. Hasbrouck has worked at the local, state, federal and international level in healthcare. He worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 11 years, first as a senior medical officer and later as the director of its work in Guyana, South America.  He was health commissioner of New York’s Ulster County, leader of the Illinois Department of Public Health and CEO of the National Association of County & City Health Officials.

 

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That’s a rare perspective on some of healthcare’s most vexing issues. As such, he finds that the various entities don’t often work well together. That’s a challenge, because all hands are needed to try to solve the tenacious problems in healthcare.

 

“The local level works best with the state level, and the state works well with the federal, but the local and federal levels don’t work well together,” he says. “Then, at the global level, there tends to be a real disconnect in that the U.S. government tends to be one small layer in a very large pool with a lack of fluidity.”

 

Despite his distinguished track record, Hasbrouck is bold in championing solutions outside traditional thinking and is eager to bring his experience to bear on a wide range of issues. His international experience, from South America to Africa, also has molded his views.

 

“What I have learned in my travels is that innovation is essential for solving problems, yet it’s the simple things that you take for granted,” he says. “For instance, when I was in Uganda, we had problems getting medications into hard-to-reach areas. We considered flying the medicine in, but then we came up with the idea of a motorcycle tag team using dry ice to keep the medicine cool.

 

“We didn’t stop there. We trained some laypeople as health workers to address the most common side effects with the patients.”

 

Hasbrouck grew up in a world where preventive health didn’t exist. His family, led by a single mom, was, for a period, reliant on welfare to survive.

 

“It might be surprising to some people, but it was a very happy time,” he says. “We were materially poor, but spiritually and culturally rich. We were inventive in our play because we didn’t have material things. I didn’t know I was deprived, although there were clearly not a lot of male role models who were white-collar professionals.”

 

Yet it’s precisely that upbringing that gives Hasbrouck his mission in stamping out inequity in care.

 

“I have lived that experience and it gives me credibility,” he says. “I’m very driven by my personal narrative. I have chosen roles carefully by the impact I can have through my skills and competencies.

 

“That’s who I am.”

 

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4 takeaways from NAHSE C-suite roundtable

By | July 17 th,  2018 | NAHSE, diversity, C-suite, Healthcare, healthcare executives | Add A Comment

Members and guests of the Chicago Chapter of the National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE) got some candid advice on career and leadership development from a recent panel of industry executives at Northwestern University.

 

Panelists for “2018 C-Suite Roundtable-Lessons in Leadership” included:

  • Adrienne White-Faines, CEO, American Osteopathic Association
  • Barrett Hatches, CEO, Chicago Family Health Center
  • Donnica Austin-Cathey, Vice President of Operations, Acute Care Hospitals, Sinai Health System
  • Tim Page, CEO, Kindred Hospital

nahse-chi 

 

NAHSE Chicago President Philip Burton moderated the discussion, while the event was spearheaded by Tiara Muse, Director of Research for Furst Group and chair of NAHSE Chicago’s Planning Committee.

The C-suite executives offered four key takeaways for upwardly mobile healthcare leaders:

  • Hatches, who has a heavy travel schedule in leading a national association, said that being a CEO can be isolating at times, and that she is “thankful for a supportive spouse and friends.”
  • Austin-Cathey noted the decisions that women executives face throughout careers when they choose to have a family.

“There were opportunities presented to me, but I passed them up to be a mom,” she said. “Figure out what is most important for you.”

  • All of them reflected on their experiences with their boards, with Page noting that boards are keenly aware of the non-verbal messaging that executives convey.

“When you are confident, they will let you lead,” he said. “If not, they will manage you.”

  • Hatches reiterated a common them among healthcare leaders: the importance of mentors and sponsors.

“A mentor is someone you can choose,” he said. “A sponsor chooses you.” With senior leaders championing his candidacy for several promotions, it helped to accelerate his career in a big way, he said.

Several events are planned in the coming months by NAHSE Chicago, including a new member luncheon July 21 and “Addressing Healthcare Disparities Through Managed Care.” For details, visit www.nahsechicago.com  or contact Tiara Muse.

Industry Report: Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle

By | November 13 th,  2017 | Blog, Data-related job titles, Digital Impact on Healthcare, healthcare executives, Industry Reports, leadership, population health, Technology and Healthcare | Add A Comment

 

Impact of Digital Transformation Industry Report Cover

In a series of interviews with senior executives and thought leaders from around the world, IIC Partners, Furst Group and other members of the IIC Partners’ Healthcare and Life Sciences group, provide an anecdotal look at the impact of digital technologies on healthcare organizations and how it affects patient care.

 

The insights gathered during these interviews deliver a comprehensive look into how advances in technology are digitizing the industry, and subsequently changing the talent requirements and overall landscape.

 

Read and Download: IIC Partners' Industry Report on the Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle

 

Outside of the IT department, many organizations are redefining leadership structures and the types of roles needed to help bridge the gap between data and performance. Some of these modified and newly created roles are:

  • Chief Digital Officer
  • Chief Medical Information Officer
  • Population Health Liaison
  • Data Protection Officer
  • Chief Performance Officer

In addition to exploring the influence on talent management, the report explores the impact of digital transformation on several other aspects of the patient life cycle, including:

  • Patient-Ownership of Health Data
  • Growth Drivers in Population Health Initiatives
  • Evolving Skillsets for Providers
  • Development of Telehealth Programs
  • Cultural Shifts Required for Digital Adaptation

Are you finding similar challenges and trends in your organization? We’d love to hear your thoughts below in the Comments section.

 

Find out how others are experiencing this impact in the full industry report, “Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle.”

 

June 8: Save the date for the Top 25 Minority Executives awards gala

By | March 4 th,  2016 | 2016, Blog, Furst Group, healthcare executives, Modern Healthcare, Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare | Add A Comment

 

Registration is open for the Modern Healthcare Top 25 Minority Executives gala, sponsored by Furst Group.

 

The dinner and celebration is scheduled for Wednesday, June 8 at the Sofitel Chicago Water Tower. The reception begins at 6 p.m., with dinner and the awards ceremony following at 7 p.m.

 

The awards honor 25 of the most powerful executives in the healthcare industry, in addition to 10 additional diverse leaders selected as People to Watch.

 

Modern Healthcare characterizes the honorees as "leaders who have successfully managed their organization; shown the ability or power to effect change in the healthcare industry; demonstrated a willingness to share expertise with others in the field; served as a role model or mentor to other minority healthcare executives; and assumed a leadership position in the industry outside of the candidate's own organization or company."

 

Early-bird tickets ($270 each) are available through April 21. For more information or to register, click here.

 

 

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